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Oily, Greasy Hair Remedies

See How Easily You Can Conquer Oily Greasy Hair

A little oil on your scalp is great for shine, but too much makes locks limp and difficult to style. More commonly associated with fine, straight hair, oily, greasy hair can also be genetic and hormone-related. Just as you pay extra attention towards the look of your skin, it is equally important to care for your oily greasy hair as well. Your hair, being the crown of your visual presence plays a major role in one’s personality and beauty. There are various steps that you need to follow to keep oily hair at bay and maintain that sheen in your hair.

Some of the basic procedures you might consider regularly include combing, brushing, conditioning and shampooing. The best brand and type of oily hair shampoo will depend upon the texture of your hair. There are many people who have dry hair and many others who have oily hair.

Oily Greasy Hair

Oily greasy hair and scalp are an issue seen regularly in the salon. Typically I tell my clients to go at least two days without shampooing, but my clients who have oily, greasy hair, complain that they can’t without looking like an oil slick.

Did you know that frequent shampooing can actually contribute to oily, greasy hair and scalp? Shampooing everyday can strip the hair and scalp of its natural oils and protectants, which triggers your hair follicles to produce more oil. . . and the pattern goes!

Try using a ‘dry shampoo’ like Klorane Extra Gentle Dry Shampoo in-between shampoos to soak up excess oil. Also, when applying conditioner, stay away from the roots of your hair (this is a common mistake). Instead, concentrate the conditioner only on the ends or the effected hair.

Another option is to do a vinegar rinse every few weeks before shampooing. Using one part vinegar to four parts water, apply the solution to your hair (avoiding scalp) and then shampoo and condition as normal.

More Tips for Oily, Greasy Hair

  • To get rid of the excessive oily, greasy hair you can massage your hair with a mixture of white vinegar and water. Leave it on for a few minutes and rinse.
  • Shampooing your hair everyday will lessen the secretions of oil on your scalp. But make sure you do not use too much of shampoo on your scalp as it may lead to dryness of the scalp thus causing hair damage. Make sure you thoroughly rinse all of the shampoo residue from your hair.
  • Cleanse your hair with a mixture of lemon juice and distilled water. This greatly reduces the oily hair.
  • Do not over use hair products like gels, sprays, creams and mousses. They make the hair oily and create excessive build up on the hair.
  • Diet also plays a major role in treating oily greasy hair. If you tend to eat excessive amounts of oily foods, the level of oil secretion in your scalp is likely to increase. So its better you stick to fresh fruits and vegetables to give you hair the necessary nourishment.
  • Limit the use of conditioner on your hair if you have oily hair. Conditioners are best suited for dry hair.
  • Rinse or soak your hair with weak tea, a lemon’s worth of juice mixed with a cup of water, or 1/4 cup of vinegar with two cups of water to correct your hair’s pH, remove residue and add shine.

 

Why Bangs Get Greasy and How to Prevent It

Greasy Bangs

There are many different reasons your bangs might begin to look oily or greasy. You’re bound to be the best judge of what is weighing you down. Common reasons include:

  • Oils from your face/skin – Whether you have an oily complexion or your bangs gets oils from constant touching and fiddling with your hair, this is a common cause of greasy bangs. Fixing the underlying problem,  be it blotting your face with blotting paper or finding a way to stop fidgeting will cut down on oily bangs. It can be difficult not to touch your bangs, but the more you fidget, the more they’ll shine.
  • Too much product – If you regularly apply styling products to your bangs, they can become greasy from product buildup. Ditto on conditioner, which your bangs don’t actually need. Cut way back on the product to enjoy oil-free bangs.
  • Sweat: Sweat from excess humidity or a power workout will bring grease to your bangs. You can’t stop yourself from sweating, so the key here is prevention. You may want to grow your bangs out for summer so you can pin them back and hide your sweat, or else pull your hair back when you’re hitting up the gym.
  • Oily hair – If your hair runs oily in general, you are more likely to experience greasy bangs. Washing your hair and your bangs with a shampoo formulated for oily hair will help, as will following the other suggestions mentioned above.

Oily Greasy Hair Bangs

Top Fixes for Oily Greasy Bangs

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, your bangs can still get greasy. If this happens, you have a few options for fixing your style quickly. Proven methods include:

  • Pinning back your bangs – Definitely the simplest fix if you’re out and about, pinning back your bangs doesn’t remove the grease but it does camouflage your bangs (and grease) from sight.
  • Dry shampoo – If you keep dry shampoo in your purse or your car (hint: If you don’t, you should), a quick spritz will take the grease and oil right out of your bangs.
  • Wet shampoo – If you’re at home, you can give your bangs a quick shampoo (and towel/blow dry) with your regular shampoo. This is certainly more hands-on than either of these other methods, and will require you to re-style your bangs when they dry, but it will de-grease the bangs. As a rule here, don’t condition your bangs as that will only make them more oily.

Bottom line is, bangs can be difficult and they may not be right for everyone. Hopefully these hair care tips will be helpful for keeping oily greasy hair to a minimum. What other tips do you employ for keeping your bangs free of oil?

  



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How to Get The Most From a Hair Stylist Appointment

Hair Stylist Appointment Strategies That Insure a Great Experience

We’ve all left the salon with a haircut that we hate. Often an upcoming hair appointment can be cause for a sleepless night or two. On the top of the worry list is the process of letting go of tried a true hairstyle, and then there’s the doubt about how your new haircut is going to look and will it even match your personality! There are some ways to head off hair stylist appointment disasters. Here are some ways to make sure you and your hairdresser are on the same page.

Hair Stylist Appointment

Understanding the Buzz Words

It is my firm belief that most hair salon disappointments can be traced directly to miscommunication. The hairstyle you’re trying to describe is not what the hair stylist sees. After all, when you think of it, every woman has her own unique idea of what “short hair” is. To one it means chin length, to a stylist it may mean above the ears and to a third person it could mean a buzz cut.

Let’s face it, our language is simply not very precise, so it is vital that you learn the terms you’re likely to hear while you’re hanging around your local salon. Like any profession hair styling has its own insider lingo. To the average client hairdresser-speak can sound like Greek, so how do you get your message across when you describe the look you want? To the rescue this quick hair dictionary.

  • LONG LAYERS lighten the weight of the hair and add swing; achieve a textured look by shortening the top of the hair.
  • TAPERING is a form of layering used to take the weight out of back of hair.
  • SLIDE LAYERS are used mostly on curly hair to reduce bulk from the top layer allowing curls to fall evenly.
  • CHIPPING is also known as point cutting, is used to add texture.
  • TEXTURIZING is done using thinning shears. It adds movement and body by reducing weight from heavy sections, while leaving extra length in others.
  • RAZORING is done with a straight-edged blade to cut or texturize the hair.
  • SLIDE CUTTING uses a very sharp scissor blade to skim over the surface at an angle.
  • SINGLE PROCESS HAIR COLOR is best used for covering gray hair.
  • DOUBLE PROCESS HAIR COLOR is used for highlights and to bleach the hair.
  • HIGH LIGHTS lighten and brighten a solid background hair color.
  • LOWLIGHTS add depth and contrast to a light solid look.

Hair Stylist Appointment

Insist on a Consultation

At many salons, stylists allow a ten-minute chat with new clients before they start cutting. The hair stylist should ask you about your lifestyle and background, what you do for fun and, if you ever had a really bad and/or good haircut, and what they looked like. You should be prepared to discuss your history of chemical treatments.

Hair Stylist Appointment

Bring In Photos

The pictures will give you some direction, but remember that it’s not like picking a shirt out of a catalog. A haircut is very handmade and the hair stylist needs to talk to you about how to tailor it to work for you.

Hair Stylist Appointment

Go elsewhere if You’ve Not been clicking During the Consultation

Same goes for after the cut begins. The most obvious warning sign is when too much is being cut off. You should also be concerned if the stylist is jumping around on your head as he/she cuts, especially at the beginning, which can lead to holes. If that’s happening, I’d get out while you still have some hair.

I have an article Getting the Best from a Hairdresser which can give you some other tips as well, but if you still are having trouble communicating with your hairdresser, maybe it’s time to move along, in that case check out my article Smart Girl’s Guide to Finding the Best Hair Stylist.

  



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How to Find a Great Hair Colorist

The Fashionista’s Guide to Finding a Great Hair Colorist

To find a fabulous hair colorist, you need to take your time. Entrusting your hair color to just anyone for a complicated process can be risky. But if you start slow, you won’t feel guilty if you need to try out a few different hair colorists.

After all, owners would like to keep your business, and if one hair colorist doesn’t satisfy, there may be another in the next chair who’s better trained or who charges less, depending on your needs. To go down this tricky path, make it known you’re interested in trying out different hair colorists when you book an appointment. This way, you’re free to find the perfect hair color pro for you.

Hair Colorist

Getting Started

So, where do you look for a great hair colorist? Here are some suggestions:

  • Go Online ~~ Do a search for “best hair colorist,” “great hair colorist” or “hair color specialist.” Check the reviews on Yelp and CitySearch. Pay particular attention to write ups that talk about the kind of hair color you want—highlights, red, etc. Searching for “hair color educator” nets you someone who trains other hair colorists. Ask friends and relatives whose hair color you love, especially if it’s similar to what you want.
  • Do Your Homework ~~ Look in hair magazines for names of hair colorists whose work you like. If you know you need someone with special expertise, i.e., you’re a brunette who wants to go blonde, your hair is badly damaged or you’re interested in doubling up on chemical services, check out the Amencan Board Certified Colorists at haircolorist.com.
  • Be a Snoop ~~ Cruise the mail, peek in windows, hang out in a waiting room—all to check out the hair color coming out the door of the salon you’re considering.

A hairdresser having a conversation with client on a couch in hair styling salon

The Consultation

Once you have a name and number, book an appointment for a consultation. Bring photos and questions. In addition to talking about your own hair and asking for ideas, ask about their training, and how often the colorist takes advanced classes and workshops. Also, find out how he or she would retouch highlights and what shade will neutralize your brassy strands. Any pro worth her palette knows the color wheel and avoids bleach overlap.

Hair Colorist Consultation

 Your First Appointment

Start with something simple—color that is just a couple shades from your own, a few highlights or a root retouch. If you like what you’re getting, return to the colorist until you trust your hair in his or her hands. If it starts looking green, brassy or otherwise bad over time or you request a bigger change that doesn’t make you happy it’s tine to look some where else.

When you book your appointment, make it clear you’ve picked the salon because its convenient for you and you’d like to try different colorists. Follow through, if you’re not completely satisfied. Color chemistry is tricky and you can only find a truly great hair colorist by seeing how he or she adjusts your hair color over time. Your color pro should discuss maintenance, home care, budget, skin tone, eye color, seasonal changes and your hair health. If you need true color correction—for instance, if you’re starting with a home bleach job—one or two tries should tell you if you’ve found someone you can count on.

How to Find a Great Hair Colorist

As Time Goes By

Be honest, if you know you’ll want to occasionally color your hair at home to save money, let your colorist know and ask for advice. Or if cash is an issue, you could see the more expensive person for major changes; then, a junior colorist for retouches.

  • Build the Relationship ~~ If you’re paying for a pro, you should feel confident enough to ask for new ideas and your hair colorist should be providing them. If you’re always asked, “DO you want the same thing we did last time?” request ideas, If you don’t get them, consider moving on before you get stuck in a rut.
  • Send Referrals ~~ There is no better way to show your appreciation than to refer others to your colorist. Show off your new shades on your Facebook page, send out a tweet or simply tell friends the old-fashioned way—by word of mouth. Also, be sure to review your hair colorist online. Many salons reward both you and your friend when you make referrals, so don’t be shy about sharing. It’s nice to spread some good news for a change

hair colorist

How do you assure the hair colorist you choose is knowledgeable, competent or . . . qualified?

Any licensed barber or beautician can legally color your hair. Cosmetologists and Barbers are tested on basic aspects of hair coloring in board exams when they are first liscensed. But, I can tell you first hand, there is much more to learn in becoming an accomplished board certified hair colorist than just becoming licensed to use hair color on the public.

Additional education is needed to become a board certified hair colorist. Unfortunately, to the demise of the profession, some learn by trial and error, or strictly by experience. Has your hair colorist chosen to extend education in the profession of hair coloring?

If you have been unable to find a good hair colorist by referral, here is one way you can assure yourself the hair colorist you chose has reached a higher level of competency and knows this complex subject matter.

The American Board of Certified Hair Colorists, has created a program with a stringent test mechanism, created by a committee of fellow licensed hair colorists professionals. The test has been developed and refined over the years to establish in the profession, a greater level of ability.

Adjustments have been made to balance the degree of difficulty of the exam, as the first year, 50% of the students failed the examination. (Only licensed barbers and beauticians can take this course. That may tell you how much the average licensed professional, is lacking, in the way of hair coloring knowledge.)

Clearly, there are various levels of ability in hair colorists. There is always more to learn about this subject. A recognized “Board Certified Hair Colorist” is an easy way for the consumer to recognize a hair colorist that has achieved a higher level of capability in hair coloring. You can find board certified hair colorists listed in ads that run in hairstyle magazines. You can call 888-425-6578 or just go to their trade association website and follow the link for finding a hair colorist in your area.

I know there are good, competent, hair colorists out there who are NOT Board Certified and that have gone the extra mile to get the training necessary to be superior hair colorists. But, I talk to a lot of consumers who have problems finding competent people. This is just an excellent resource for the consumer to be able to select those hair colorists, in their area, that have clearly reached a greater level of excellence.

  



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