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How to Find a Great Hair Colorist

The Fashionista’s Guide to Finding a Great Hair Colorist

To find a fabulous hair colorist, you need to take your time. Entrusting your hair color to just anyone for a complicated process can be risky. But if you start slow, you won’t feel guilty if you need to try out a few different hair colorists.

After all, owners would like to keep your business, and if one hair colorist doesn’t satisfy, there may be another in the next chair who’s better trained or who charges less, depending on your needs. To go down this tricky path, make it known you’re interested in trying out different hair colorists when you book an appointment. This way, you’re free to find the perfect hair color pro for you.

Hair Colorist

Getting Started

So, where do you look for a great hair colorist? Here are some suggestions:

  • Go Online ~~ Do a search for “best hair colorist,” “great hair colorist” or “hair color specialist.” Check the reviews on Yelp and CitySearch. Pay particular attention to write ups that talk about the kind of hair color you want—highlights, red, etc. Searching for “hair color educator” nets you someone who trains other hair colorists. Ask friends and relatives whose hair color you love, especially if it’s similar to what you want.
  • Do Your Homework ~~ Look in hair magazines for names of hair colorists whose work you like. If you know you need someone with special expertise, i.e., you’re a brunette who wants to go blonde, your hair is badly damaged or you’re interested in doubling up on chemical services, check out the Amencan Board Certified Colorists at haircolorist.com.
  • Be a Snoop ~~ Cruise the mail, peek in windows, hang out in a waiting room—all to check out the hair color coming out the door of the salon you’re considering.

A hairdresser having a conversation with client on a couch in hair styling salon

The Consultation

Once you have a name and number, book an appointment for a consultation. Bring photos and questions. In addition to talking about your own hair and asking for ideas, ask about their training, and how often the colorist takes advanced classes and workshops. Also, find out how he or she would retouch highlights and what shade will neutralize your brassy strands. Any pro worth her palette knows the color wheel and avoids bleach overlap.

Hair Colorist Consultation

 Your First Appointment

Start with something simple—color that is just a couple shades from your own, a few highlights or a root retouch. If you like what you’re getting, return to the colorist until you trust your hair in his or her hands. If it starts looking green, brassy or otherwise bad over time or you request a bigger change that doesn’t make you happy it’s tine to look some where else.

When you book your appointment, make it clear you’ve picked the salon because its convenient for you and you’d like to try different colorists. Follow through, if you’re not completely satisfied. Color chemistry is tricky and you can only find a truly great hair colorist by seeing how he or she adjusts your hair color over time. Your color pro should discuss maintenance, home care, budget, skin tone, eye color, seasonal changes and your hair health. If you need true color correction—for instance, if you’re starting with a home bleach job—one or two tries should tell you if you’ve found someone you can count on.

How to Find a Great Hair Colorist

As Time Goes By

Be honest, if you know you’ll want to occasionally color your hair at home to save money, let your colorist know and ask for advice. Or if cash is an issue, you could see the more expensive person for major changes; then, a junior colorist for retouches.

  • Build the Relationship ~~ If you’re paying for a pro, you should feel confident enough to ask for new ideas and your hair colorist should be providing them. If you’re always asked, “DO you want the same thing we did last time?” request ideas, If you don’t get them, consider moving on before you get stuck in a rut.
  • Send Referrals ~~ There is no better way to show your appreciation than to refer others to your colorist. Show off your new shades on your Facebook page, send out a tweet or simply tell friends the old-fashioned way—by word of mouth. Also, be sure to review your hair colorist online. Many salons reward both you and your friend when you make referrals, so don’t be shy about sharing. It’s nice to spread some good news for a change

hair colorist

How do you assure the hair colorist you choose is knowledgeable, competent or . . . qualified?

Any licensed barber or beautician can legally color your hair. Cosmetologists and Barbers are tested on basic aspects of hair coloring in board exams when they are first liscensed. But, I can tell you first hand, there is much more to learn in becoming an accomplished board certified hair colorist than just becoming licensed to use hair color on the public.

Additional education is needed to become a board certified hair colorist. Unfortunately, to the demise of the profession, some learn by trial and error, or strictly by experience. Has your hair colorist chosen to extend education in the profession of hair coloring?

If you have been unable to find a good hair colorist by referral, here is one way you can assure yourself the hair colorist you chose has reached a higher level of competency and knows this complex subject matter.

The American Board of Certified Hair Colorists, has created a program with a stringent test mechanism, created by a committee of fellow licensed hair colorists professionals. The test has been developed and refined over the years to establish in the profession, a greater level of ability.

Adjustments have been made to balance the degree of difficulty of the exam, as the first year, 50% of the students failed the examination. (Only licensed barbers and beauticians can take this course. That may tell you how much the average licensed professional, is lacking, in the way of hair coloring knowledge.)

Clearly, there are various levels of ability in hair colorists. There is always more to learn about this subject. A recognized “Board Certified Hair Colorist” is an easy way for the consumer to recognize a hair colorist that has achieved a higher level of capability in hair coloring. You can find board certified hair colorists listed in ads that run in hairstyle magazines. You can call 888-425-6578 or just go to their trade association website and follow the link for finding a hair colorist in your area.

I know there are good, competent, hair colorists out there who are NOT Board Certified and that have gone the extra mile to get the training necessary to be superior hair colorists. But, I talk to a lot of consumers who have problems finding competent people. This is just an excellent resource for the consumer to be able to select those hair colorists, in their area, that have clearly reached a greater level of excellence.

  



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How to find a board certified hair colorist

Hair Colorist

How do you assure the hair colorist you choose is knowledgeable, competent or . . . qualified?

Any licensed barber or beautician can legally color your hair. Cosmetologists and Barbers are tested on basic aspects of hair coloring in board exams. But, I can tell you first hand, there is much more to learn in becoming an accomplished board certified hair colorist than just becoming licensed to use hair color on the public.

Additional education is needed to become a board certified hair colorist. Unfortunately, to the demise of our profession, some learn by trial and error, or strictly by experience. Has your hair colorist chosen to extend education in the profession of hair coloring?

If you have been unable to find a good hair colorist by referral, here is one way you can assure yourself the hair colorist you chose has reached a higher level of competency and knows this complex subject matter.

The American Board of Certified Hair Colorists, has created a program with a stringent test mechanism, created by a committee of fellow licensed hair colorists professionals. The test has been developed and refined over the past 5 years to establish in the profession, a greater level of ability.

Adjustments have been made to balance the degree of difficulty of the exam, as the first year, 50% of the students failed the examination. (Only licensed barbers and beauticians can take this course. That may tell you how much the average licensed professional, is lacking, in the way of hair coloring knowledge.)

Clearly, there are various levels of ability in hair colorists. There is always more to learn about this subject. A recognized “Board Certified Hair Colorist” is an easy way for the consumer to recognize a hair colorist that has achieved a higher level of capability in hair coloring.

So how do you find these Board Certified Hair Colorists?

Currently, you can find board certified hair colorists listed in ads that run in hairstyle magazines. You can call 888-425-6578 or just go to their trade association website and follow the link for finding a hair colorist in your area.

I know there are good, competent, hair colorists out there who are NOT Board Certified and that have gone the extra mile to get the training necessary to be superior hair colorists. But, I talk to a lot of consumers who have problems finding competent people. This is just an excellent resource for the consumer to be able to select those hair colorists, in their area, that have clearly reached a greater level of excellence.

The website has a practice exam online for professionals. I suggest any of you licensed professionals, who question if you could get any benefit in taking this course, to go there and take it. Go to, FAQ’s, Review Study Material, Practice Exam.
 
  



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How to Get Back to Your Natural Hair Color

Do you want to get your natural hair color back?

The” how-to” of getting back to your natural hair color can be tricky and is always best left to a hair colorist professional.  But, if you’re getting this answer from your professional hair colorist . . . well, let’s just say, I would be looking elsewhere to spend my money.

I have a problem with my hair color. I have been told by a couple different hairdressers that it’s the chemistry of my hair, but I think there still has to be a solution. My natural hair color is a light ASHY brown. I have had bleach high lights and have tried on various occasions to get back to my natural color. The hairdressers will put a “ash” color on and it will take on my processed hair but will turn my natural ashy roots red! No one can seem to find a solution. Can anyone give me any advice about fixing this issue?

,,

I think you are right! Given the response, “it’s the chemistry of your hair that’s causing the problem,” after the fact, sounds like an excuse to me and that in reality, these people don’t have the know-how to do the corrective coloring your hair requires.

From what you have described, the hair colorist is putting the same solution on your virgin hair as your processed hair and is expecting the same results? That can’t happen! The basic formula that applies to all hair coloring

  • YOUR BASE COLOR + ADDED COLOR= FINAL COLOR

There is more than one way to go about getting your hair back to your natural ashy brown hair color and your hair colorist would need to see you to decide the best route to get you there. But your situation appears, at least from what you’ve mentioned, to be easy to remedy.

It could be that you may need nothing more than toning down the hair color as needed until the unwanted high lighted hair has been cut off. But it’s not possible for me, or anyone for that matter, to give the right solution, chemically speaking, over the internet .  .  . after all, you have seen what can happen even when someone has you right there in their chair!

Your best solution lies in finding a really top-notch hair colorist and there are many of them out there. I know it can be discouraging when you’ve had bad results as you’ve mentioned, but don’t give up, just find better resources. You can try, the list of the Board Certified Hair Colorists in your area. Ask for referrals from friends, training schools or any woman who has a great hair color!

Try a reputable advanced training center and get it fixed at a discounted price, the schools are there to teach the students how to do corrective coloring and every step is heavily supervised.

 

  



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